Course Disclosure for

Hollywood's America

Hollywood's America:


MEDAILLE COLLEGE AGASSIZ CIRCLE BUFFALO, NEW YORK 14214

COURSE DISCLOURE

COURSE NUMBER: HIS 390 COURSE TITLE: Hollywood's America: United States History
Through Movies and Television

SECTION: 03-AA SEMESTER: Spring 1012

NUMBER OF CREDITS: 3

PREREQUISITES: Junior Standing, any two Social Science courses, and WRT 200

INSTRUCTOR: Timothy Dzierba, Ph.D.

INSTRUCTOR AVAILABILITY: Tim's Homepage: http://drtimothydzierba.com
E-mail: tdzierba@medaille.edu FAX: Medaille: 884-0291 Home: 773-5374 Phone: Medaille:
884-3281 or voice mail - 884-3411, ext. 248 Home: 773-5374

PLEASE NOTE: Grading of student papers will reflect standard English usage. The MLA
bibliographic style is generally used at Medaille.

Statement on Disabilities: Any student with a disability who believes he/she needs
accommodation(s) in order to complete this course should contact the Office of Disability
Services as soon as possible. The staff in the Office of Disability Services will determine what
accommodations are appropriate and reasonable under the Americans with Disabilities Act.
The Office of Disability Services is located in the Main Building in Room M021 and can be
reached by phone at (716) 884-3281, extension 280.

A. CATALOG DESCRIPTION OF COURSE:

A study of the American experience via movies and television against the backdrop of the
culture of the United States in the late 19th and entire 20th century.

B. OBJECTIVES: The student will: -view films and use primary sources and anthologies as
tools to interpret the visual experience. -demonstrate a variety of film and television genres in
America history that include, but are not limited to the Western, horror films, criminal justice
themes, war-time films, and genres related to outer space, women's rights, racism, comedy,
and political education. -point out an historiography in the film industry that parallels
historical writings. Television and films, therefore, reflect the Zeitgeist of the time in which
they were produced and directed. -demonstrate a sense of the United States as a diverse
community that is sometimes polarized or synthesized by the film or television.

C. OUTLINE OF COURSE CONTENT:

Introduction

The Great Depression and the Civil War--- Gone with the Wind

World War II--- Casablanca

The Cold War--- Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956) On the Waterfront

Nuclear War--- Dr Strangelove

The West--- The Magnificent Seven

The Civil Rights Movement--- Mississippi Burning

Violence in Movies

The Counterculture--- The Graduate

D. METHOD OF EVALUATION:

Three (3) four-page papers 75% Class participation 25%

E. COURSE ATTENDANCE POLICY:

Mandatory

F. TEXTBOOK(S):

Mintz, Steven and Randy Roberts, eds. Hollywood's America: United States History Through
Its Films. St. James, NY: Brandywine Press, 1993.

Stark, Steven D. Glued to the Set: The 60 Television Shows That Made Us Who We Are
Today. NY: The Free Press, 1997.

G. SUGGESTED READING LIST:

Selected Film Bibliography

BASIC BOOKS ON HOW MOVIES ARE MADE

Bobker, Lee R. Elements of Film. NY: Harcourt, Brace and World, 1969.

Foss, Bob. Filmmaking: Narrative and Structural Techniques. Los Angeles: Silman-James
Press, 1992.

Giannetti, Louis. Understanding Movies. 6th edition. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall,
1993.

Huss, Roy and Norman Silverstein. The Film Experience: Elements of Motion Picture Art. NY:
Dell Publishing, Co., 1968.

Kawin, Bruce F. How Movies Work. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1992.

Lumet, Sidney. Making Movies. NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 1995.

Monaco, James. How to Read a Film: The Art, Technology, Language, History, and Theory of
Film and Media. Revised edition. NY: Oxford University Press, 1981.

Montagu, Ivor. Film World: A Guide to Cinema. Baltimore: Penguin Books, 1964.

Perkins, V.F. Film as Film: Understanding and Judging Movies. Baltimore: Penguin Books,
1972.

Withers, Robert S. Introduction to Film: A Guide to the Art, Technology, Language, and
Appreciation of Film. NY: Harper & Row Publishers, 1983.

ENCYCLOPEDIAS OF MOVIE FACTS

Connors, Martin and Julia Furtaw, eds. VideoHound's Golden Movie Retriever: 1994. Detroit:
Visible Ink Press, 1994.

Ebert, Roger. Roger Ebert's Video Companion: 1997 Edition. Kansas City: Andrews and
McMeel, 1996.

Halliwell, Leslie. Halliwell's Filmgoer's and Video Viewer's Companion. 9th edition. NY:
Harper & Row Perennial Library Edition, 1990.

Katz, Ephraim. The Film Encyclopedia: The Most Comprehensive Encyclopedia of World
Cinema in a Single Volume. 2nd edition. NY: HarperCollins, 1994.

Matthews, Charles. Oscar A to Z: A Complete Guide to More Than 2,400 Movies Nominated
for Academy Awards!. NY: Doubleday, 1995.

Walker, John, ed. Halliwell's Film Guide. Revised and Updated. NY: HarperCollins Publishers,
1995.

THE HISTORY OF MOVIES

Mast, Gerald. A Short History of the Movies. 2nd edition. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merril, Co.,
1976.

Reader, Keith. The Cinema: A History. NY: David McKay & Co., 1979.

Shipman, David. The Story of Cinema: A Complete Narrative From the Beginnings to the
Present. NY: St. Martin's Press, 1982.

ESSAYS, GENERAL AND PARTICULAR STUDIES

Andrew, Dudley. Concepts in Film Theory. NY: Oxford University Press, 1984.

Arijon, Daniel. Grammar of the Film Language. Los Angeles: Silman-James Press, 1976.

Arnheim, Rudolf. Film as Art. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1957.

Bach, Steven. Final Cut: Dreams and Disaster in the Making of Heaven's Gate. NY:
Quill/William Morrow, 1985.

Baehr, Ted. Hollywood's Reel of Fortune: A Winning Strategy to Redeem the Entertainment
Industry. Fort Lauderdale: Coral Ridge Ministries, no date.

Selected Television Bibliography

Adler, ed. "All in the Family": A Critical Appraisal. Praeger, 1979.

Alda. The Last Days of "M*A*S*H." Unicorn Publishing House, 1983.

Barabas and Barabas. Gunsmoke: A Complete History and Analysis . . .. McFarland, 1990.

Barnouw. Tube of Plenty: The Evolution of American Television. Oxford University Press,
1975.

Baughman. The Republic of Mass Culture: Journalism, Filmmaking, and Broadcasting in
America Since 1941. Johns Hopkins University Press, 1992.

Bianculli. Teleliteracy: Taking Television Seriously. Continuum, 1992.

Bliss. Now the News: The Story of Broadcast Journalism. Columbia University Press, 1991.

Brinkley. David Brinkley. Knopf, 1995.

Brooks and Marsh. The Complete Directory to Prime Time Network and Cable TV Shows.
Ballantine Books, 1995.

Castleman and Podrazik. Watching TV: Four Decades of American Television. McGraw-Hill,
1982.

Englehardt. The End of Victory Culture: Cold War America and the Disillusioning of a
Generation. Basic Books, 1995.

Esso. The Book of Lists. Arlington House Publishers, 1981.

Greenfield. Television: The First Fifty Years. Crescent Books, 1981.

Iavna. Cult TV. St. Martin's Press, 1985.

Kisselhoff. The Box: An Oral History of Television. Viking, 1995.

Marc. Comic Visions: Television Comedy and American Culture. Unwin Hyman, 1989.

------ and Thompson. Prime Time, Prime Movers. Little Brown, 1992.

McNeil. Total Television: The Comprehensive Guide to Programming From 1948 to the
Present. Penguin Books, 1996.

Reiss. "M*A*S*H": The Exclusive Inside Story of TV's Most Popular Show. Merrill, 1980.

Sackett. Prime Time Hits. Billboard Books, 1993.

Spiegel. Make Room for TV: Television and the Family Ideal in Postwar America. University
of Chicago Press, 1992.

Steinberg. TV Facts. Facts on File, 1980.

Stempel. Storytellers to the Nation: A History of Television Writing. Continuum, 1992.

Stern and Stern. Encyclopedia of Pop Culture. Harper Perennial, 1992.

Weiner and eds. The TV Guide TV Book. Harper Perennial, 1992.

Zelizer. Covering the Body: The Kennedy Assassination, the Media, and the Shaping of
Collective Memory. University of Chicago Press, 1992.

TV Guide 2000th Issue, 1991.

H. OTHER SPECIFICATIONS, REQUIREMENTS, OR ARRANGEMENTS APPROPRIATE TO
THE COURSE:

None