HIS 410 War and Peace in the Nuclear Age Course Disclosure

MEDAILLE COLLEGE AGASSIZ CIRCLE BUFFALO, NEW YORK 14214

COURSE DISCLOSURE

COURSE NUMBER: HIS 410 COURSE TITLE: War & Peace in the Nuclear Age

SECTION:  Summer 2009

NUMBER OF CREDITS: 3

PREREQUISITES: None

INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Timothy R. Dzierba

INSTRUCTOR AVAILABILITY: See Office Door M209 for Office Hours
Course  Wednesdays 5:45 to 8:45  Room 100
M209 5:00 to 5:30  and by Appointment
Home Page
http://drtimothydzierba.com
Email
tdzierba@medaille.edu
timothydzierba@gmail.com
olympic_98@yahoo.com

Phone: Medaille: 884-3281; voice mail - 884-3411, ext. 248 Home: 773-5374 PLEASE NOTE: Grading of student
papers will reflect standard English usage. The MLA bibliographic style is generally used at Medaille.

Statement on Disabilities: Any student with a disability who believes he/she needs accommodation(s) in order to
complete this course should contact the Office of Disability Services as soon as possible. The staff in the Office
of Disability Services will determine what accommodations are appropriate and reasonable under the Americans
with Disabilities Act. The Office of Disability Services is located in the Main Building in Room M021 and can be
reached by phone at (716) 884-3281, extension 280.

A. CATALOG DESCRIPTION OF COURSE:

This course examines the origins and evaluation of the nuclear competition between the United States and the
Soviet Union and its impact upon the world.

B. OBJECTIVES:

The student will be able to: -examine the origins and evolution of the nuclear competition between the United
States and the Soviet Union and its impact on the world, and to be able to draw their conclusions on the critical
issues that flow from it: the nature of deterrence; the role of science and technology; decision-making, diplomacy
and negotiation in the nuclear age; and the ethical debate on nuclear weapons. -have an overview of the major
events of the nuclear age from 1941 to the present including excerpts from personal diaries, memoirs, letters,
and speeches of key figures. -be able to identify a sense of the public mood and political policies of the times by
examining historical accounts, newspapers articles, government documents, and secondary critical analyses.
-investigate how to deal with the threat of nuclear war or peace. Is this primarily a political, religious, academic,
or scientific issue?

C. OUTLINE OF COURSE CONTENT:

DAWN Introduction The Nature of the Grand Alliance The Development of the Atomic Bomb The End of World
War II

THE WEAPON OF CHOICE The Emergence of the Cold War The Growth of the US Nuclear Arsenal The
Development of the Hydrogen Bomb The Significant of the Korean War

A BIGGER BANG FOR THE BUCK The New Look and Massive Retaliation The Bomber and Missile Gaps The
Consolidation of US Nuclear Planning

EUROPE GOES NUCLEAR The Nuclearization of NATO Rearmed Allies: Great Britain, France, and West
Germany Managing the NATO Deterrent

AT THE BRICK Background to the Cuban Missile Crisis The Thirteen Days Lessons of the Cuban Missile Crisis
THE EDUCATION OF ROBERT MCNAMARA Reducing US Vulnerability The Evolution of US Strategic Doctrine
The ABM Debate

ONE STEP FORWARD... Arms Control and Detente SALT I: The ABM Treaty and Interim Agreement After SALT
I: MIRVS, Strategic Parity, and the Decline of Detente

HAVES AND HAVE-NOTES Nuclear Weapons and Nuclear Power Attempts to Control Proliferation The Spread of
Nuclear Weapons Capability

CARTER'S NEW WORLD A Troubled Administration Geopolitics and Arms Control: The Questions of Linkage
SALT II: Negotiations and Agreement

ZERO HOUR NATO's Dilemmas NATO's Decision to Deploy New Nuclear Weapons The INF Negotiations

MISSILE EXPERIMENTAL The Origins of the MX The Search for an MX Basing Scheme From MX to Midgetman

REAGAN'S SHIELD The Offensive Buildup Strategic Defense Arms Control: Fits and Starts

VISIONS OF WAR AND PEACE A Look Back Differing Perspectives and Policy Options What Citizens Can Do

D. METHOD OF EVALUATION OF STUDENTS:

Three (3) short papers (in class) 50% Class Participation 50% Class participation may be written or oral.

E. ATTENDANCE POLICY:

Students are expected to be present and prepared for all classes. If for any reason a student is absent or tardy
from class, it is the responsibility of the student to seek out all pertinent assignments for the subsequent
class(es). Please do not call the instructor for class assignments. Each student attends college and pays tuition.
The college experience affords students an opportunity to accumulate theoretical and experiential knowledge.
Each student also expects a final grade as an indicator of the student's academic success. Academic excellence
and achievement is measured by a student's mastery of the subject, attendance, punctuality, class participation,
eagerness to learn, academic persistence, scholastic attitude, and successful completion of assignments. This
instructor promotes and encourages class participation in class. Class participation gives students a unique
opportunity to interact with the instructor and with each other. Class participation assumes that each student will
read the assigned chapters of a book and reflect upon the ideas and concepts explained in the readings. Class
participation also assumes that we respect and have tolerance for differing points of view. Under no
circumstances will students be allowed to ridicule one another because of differing points of view. Students are
encouraged to think and criticize one another based upon scholarly research and not parochial reactions. This
instructor will not tolerate random idle talking during class time.

F. TEXTBOOKS:

Porro. The Nuclear Age Reader. Knopf.

G. SUGGESTED READING LIST:

Please refer to "Suggested Reading" in the textbook.

H. OTHER SPECIFICATIONS, REQUIREMENTS OR ARRANGEMENTS APPROPRIATE TO THE COURSE:

None.