MEDAILLE COLLEGE AGASSIZ CIRCLE BUFFALO, NEW YORK 14214

COURSE DISCLOSURE STATEMENT

COURSE NUMBER: HIS 150 COURSE TITLE: Contemporary United States History

SECTION: 01-E SEMESTER: Spring 2012

NUMBER OF CREDITS: 3

PREREQUISITES: None

INSTRUCTOR: Timothy R. Dzierba, PhD.

INSTRUCTOR AVAILABILITY: See Office Door M209 for Office Hours Tim's Homepage:
hhtp://dzierba.tripod.com E-mail: tdzierba@medaille.edu Medaille FAX: 884-0291; Medaille phone: 884-3281,
ext. 248; Home phone: 773-5374

PLEASE NOTE: Grading of student papers will reflect standard English usage. The MLA bibliographic style is
generally used at Medaille.

Statement on Disabilities: Any student with a disability who believes he/she needs accommodation(s) in order to
complete this course should contact the Office of Disability Services as soon as possible. The staff in the Office
of Disability Services will determine what accommodations are appropriate and reasonable under the Americans
with Disabilities Act. The Office of Disability Services is located in the Main Building in Room M021 and can be
reached by phone at (716) 884-3281, extension 280.

A. CATALOG DESCRIPTION OF COURSE:

An exploration of United States history from 1900 to the present.

B. OBJECTIVES:

To be able to identify the efforts of White southerners after Reconstruction to create a "New South" that was
imitative of the northern industrialization and urbanization.

To demonstrate an understanding of the industrialization and urbanization of post-Civil War America.

To be able to describe how the United States, along with other Western nations, participated in the imperialist
scramble for territories in the late nineteenth century.

To demonstrate an understanding of why the United States became involved in World War I and the nation's
ultimate contributions to an Allied victory.

To be able to describe life on the home front during the war (government regulations, war production,
propaganda and civil liberties, racial issues, and so forth).

To demonstrate an understanding of the effects of the Great Depression on the lives of all Americans.

To be able to describe the various New Deal programs and how people responded (or failed to respond) to
them.

To demonstrate an understanding of why Truman ultimately decided to use the atomic bomb and the factors
that affected the decision.

To demonstrate an understanding of containment and our involvement in Vietnam.

To identify major post-World War II social and demographic changes.

To demonstrate knowledge of post-war domestic and global politics.

C. OUTLINE OF COURSE OUTLINE:

I. Introduction: What is History a. How to Read History b. How to Take Notes c. Looking it up and Citing It

II. The Machine, Reform, and Politics, 1877-1917 (The Machine Age, The Fame and Shame of the Cities,
Everyday Life and Culture, Gilded Age Politics, The Progressive Era, The Quest for Empire.

WASHINGTON AND DUBOIS, AFRICAN AMERICAN ALTERNATIVES IN THE NEW SOUTH - THE PROBLEM,
THE SOURCES, THE EVIDENCE, QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER

HOW THEY LIVED, THE MIDDLE CLASS 1870-1917 - THE PROBLEM, THE SOURCES, THE EVIDENCE,
QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER

JUSTIFYING AMERICAN IMPERIALISM: THE LOUISIANA PURCHASE EXPOSITION 1904 - THE PROBLEM, THE
SOURCES, THE EVIDENCE AND QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER

PERSUASION AND THE PROGRESSIVES: REGULATING CHILD LABOR - THE PROBLEM, THE SOURCES,
THE EVIDENCE AND QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER

III. America at World War One

IV. The 1920s

V. The Great Depression

VI. The Cold War and American Politics - 1945-1953

THE BURDENS OF POWER: THE DECISION TO DROP THE ATOMIC BOMB -THE PROBLEM, THE SOURCES,
THE EVIDENCE AND QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER

THE SECOND RED SCARE: HUAC VS. HOLLYWOOD (1947) - THE PROBLEM, THE SOURCES, THE
EVIDENCE AND QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER

VII. Vietnam and Watergate

A GENERATION IN WAR AND TURMOIL: THE AGONY OF VIETNAM - THE PROBLEM, THE SOURCES, THE
EVIDENCE AND QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER

D. METHOD OF EVALUATING STUDENTS:

See Test Bank Link

E. ATTENDANCE POLICY:

Students are expected to be present and prepared for all classes. If for any reason a student is absent or tardy
from class, it is the responsibility of the student to seek out all pertinent assignments for the subsequent
class(es). Please do not telephone the instructor for class assignments. You may email instructor for class
assignments and for any other question(s). Each student attends college and pays tuition. The college
experience affords students an opportunity to accumulate theoretical and experiential knowledge. Each student
also expects a final grade as an indicator of the student's academic success. Academic excellence and
achievement is measured by a student's mastery of the subject, attendance, punctuality, class participation,
eagerness to learn, academic persistence, scholastic attitude, and successful completion of assignments.
ALSO SEE COURSE POLICIES ON MY HOME PAGECourse Policies

F. TEXTBOOKS:

A Patriot's History of the United States.
Larry Schweikart and Michael Allen

G. SUGGESTED READING LIST:

Suggested readings are listed at the end of the each chapter in the text.

H. OTHER SPECIFICATIONS, REQUIREMENTS, OR ARRANGEMENTS APPROPRIATE TO THE COURSE:

None